News and Notes related to Digital Media Transcription, Analysis, and Captioning.
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  • Speedy Shortcut Configurations

    Posted on February 17th, 2015 Alex No comments

    One of the easiest ways to speed up your transcription process is to setup shortcuts. You don’t have to be a professional transcriptionist to reap the benefits of quick-access commands. Whether you’re a newbie, a casual user, or aspiring to become InqScribe elite, improving your shortcut (and snippet) setup will help center your focus on the transcript, rather than on controlling media.

    To be clear, InqScribe already has some shortcuts pre-loaded. Your operating system also uses designates certain keys for system-wide shortcuts. We’ve listed these in-use shortcuts and suggested some available trigger keys in this Knowledge Base article. To sum it up, here’s what you’ll want to avoid:

    • Key combinations that are already in use by your system (system defaults)
    • Key combinations that are already in use by InqScribe (InqScribe defaults)
    • Keys that you’re likely to type in your transcript.

    To help get you started, we’ve created two sample configurations- one simple, one more advanced. These configurations should work on most systems, so you won’t have to worry about any of the conflicts described above.

    A Simple Shortcut Configuration

    If you don’t have much experience transcribing, here’s a setup that will be easy to learn:

    Cue Shortcut

    Tab Play/Pause (default)
    Ctrl/Command-Tab Skipback 8 seconds (default)
    Ctrl/Command-0 Insert current time
    Ctrl/Command-9 Cue
    Ctrl/Command-8 Review

     

    The idea is that these shortcuts are kept simple and are located within your field of vision, unobstructed by your hands. Even for beginners, we recommend using Cue and Review as opposed to Fast Forward and Rewind- it’s simply easier to control. In case you’re not familiar, the “Cue” command is essentially a modified Fast Forward. The media will play forwards at a speed of your choice until the trigger key is released, at which point it will resume playing. The “Review” command functions in the same way as
    a Rewind.

    An Advanced Shortcut Configuration

    After getting more acquainted with InqScribe, you may wish to incorporate more shortcuts and revamp your setup. Here’s a sample configuration for a more advanced user:

    Tab Play/Pause (default)
    Ctrl/Command-Tab Skipback 8 seconds (default)
    Ctrl/Command-0 Insert current time
    Ctrl/Command-9 Cue
    Ctrl/Command-8 Review
    Ctrl/Command-[ Change Play Rate -0.1x
    Ctrl/Command-] Change Play Rate 0.1x
    Ctrl/Command-J Go To Previous Timecode
    Ctrl/Command-L Go To Next Timecode

     

    Generally, the less you have to take your hands off the keyboard, the faster you can type. This shortcut setup will give you more independence from your mouse. One important addition is the ability to fine-tune the play rate to match your typing speed. The Go To Previous Timecode and Go To Next Timecode shortcuts now allow you to quickly review your timecode placement, which is crucial if you plan on creating subtitles from your transcript.

    Note this setup leaves Ctrl/Command-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 open for custom snippets.

    If you use shortcuts with other programs in your workflow, you might try configuring InqScribe to match them. For an example, check out this previous blog entry about adopting Final Cut Pro/Avid shortcuts.

    Although the ideal setup will vary from user to user, these shortcut configurations should give you an idea of how to optimize your InqScribe experience. If you have any shortcut tips you’d like to share with other InqScribe users, send an email to support@inqscribe.com.

  • Keyboard Shortcuts for Film Editors

    Posted on January 24th, 2012 ben No comments

    One of our customers, a professor at a film school, suggested this tip:

    For those of you used to using industry standard editting software like Final Cut and Avid, you can map “j”, “k”, and “l” with modifier keys to back/pause/forward.  Since you need the j/k/l keys for actually inputting text during transcription, you’ll need to use modifier keys (Ctrl, Command, etc.).

    On the Mac you would use the “Command” and “Option” keys to set up something like this:

    • Command-j => Play Backwards at Custom Rate 1.x
    • Command-Option-j => Play Backwards at Custom Rate 2.0x
    • Command-k => Pause
    • Command-l => Play at Custom Rate 1.x
    • Command-Option-l => Play at Custom Rate 2.0x

    In Windows you would use the “Ctrl” and “Shift” keys to set up something like this:

    • Ctrl-j => Play Backwards at Custom Rate 1.x
    • Ctrl-Shift-j => Play Backwards at Custom Rate 2.0x
    • Ctrl-k => Pause
    • Ctrl-l => Play at Custom Rate 1.x
    • Ctrl-Shift-l => Play at Custom Rate 2.0x

    You can obviously tweak these to suit your workflow.

    Note that by setting Command-l/Ctrl-l to “Play at Custom Rate 1.x” you can toggle back and forth between the fast speed and the slow speed.  If you set it to “Play” instead, hitting Command-l/Ctrl-l would only continue playing at the current play rate.  So if you’re already at 2.x, the play rate won’t change.

    An alternative approach would be to set Command-Option-l/Ctrl-Shift-l to “Change Play Rate” by 1.x.  Then every time you hit Command-Option-l/Ctrl-Shift-l the play rate would increase to 2.x, 3.x, etc..  And you can hit Command-l/Ctrl-l to get back to the 1.x rate.  This would more emulate the behavior of FCP.

    For instructions on how to set up shortcuts: http://www.inqscribe.com/docs/keyboardshortcuts.html

    Comments are turned off in this blog, but head on over to our Facebook page for to leave comments: http://www.facebook.com/InqScribe

  • Tip: USB Shortcut/Foot Pedal Crashing Workarounds

    Posted on April 12th, 2011 ben No comments

    If you’re using a corded Microsoft Digital Media keyboard or some multimedia keyboards from other manufacturers (we know of one case from Acer), you might be experiencing odd crashes when you try to run the “Set Up Foot Pedal” wizard or define shortcuts triggers.

    (This tip is also helpful for others who might be experiencing crashes while setting up a foot pedal or defining shortcuts.)

    We’re working on a fix for this, but in the meantime here’s what you can do:

    1. Plug in only the minimal USB devices you need to set up the foot pedal: e.g. a mouse and the foot pedal.
    2. Unplug your digital media keyboard, and all unnecessary USB devices.
    3. Start InqScribe.
    4. Run the Set Up Foot Pedal wizard (or define your shortcut triggers).
    5. Quit InqScribe.
    6. Plug in your digital media keyboard (and other devices).
    7. Start InqScribe again.

    As always, we welcome your feedback and bug reports. We will do our best to work with you to resolve them.