News and Notes related to Digital Media Transcription, Analysis, and Captioning.
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  • Using InqScribe Labs for Additional File Formats

    Posted on July 25th, 2018 Alex No comments

    Did you know InqScribe offers access to more export formats than what’s in the app? Our InqScribe Labs website allows you to convert your InqScribe transcript into a few extra formats.

    InqScribe Labs

     

    What is InqScribe Labs? InqScribe Labs is website that gives users access to experimental new features. Currently, the site houses a few commonly requested exported formats that we’re working on adding into the InqScribe app.

     
    How do I use the extra formats? Prepare your transcript, upload the .inqscr file to one of the exporter pages, select your options (if applicable), and then click “download” to receive the converted file.

    The full list of exporters is available here. They include:
    You’ll find more detailed instructions on how to convert in the export format pages above. Please note that our converter is still experimental in nature and subject to change. If you have questions, feel free to email us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • What’s the Deal with WebVTT?

    Posted on May 1st, 2015 Alex No comments

    As you might have noticed, InqScribe version 2.2.3 includes a new subtitle export format: WebVTT. Why should you care? Although it’s a young format, WebVTT has quickly become a new standard, supported by HTML5, YouTube, and Vimeo. Here’s a quick overview of what you can do with WebVTT:

    What is WebVTT?

    WebVTT is a text-based format similar to Subrip SRT. What’s special about WebVTT is that it’s compatible with HTML. You can use WebVTT to provide extra information about HTML video, including subtitles, closed captions, descriptions, metadata, and chapters. Not only does this make videos more accessible, it helps keep them organized, and gives you a space to make notes or annotations.

    Here’s a sample of what a WebVTT file looks like:

    WEBVTT 1
    00:00:00.000 --> 00:00:15.365
    Start of video.
    
    2
    00:00:15.366 --> 00:00:17.432
    Puts down toy.
    
    3
    00:00:17.433 --> 00:00:25.632
    Picks up toy again.
    Calls out.

    How do I use WebVTT?

    To export a WebVTT file from InqScribe, simply prepare your transcript and select “File > Export > WebVTT…”

    Once exported, you could use the WebVTT file to create captions for YouTube and Vimeo videos. For instructions on how to take your InqScribe transcript into YouTube, head over to our guide here.

    To use your WebVTT file with an HTML video, just enter the appropriate references into the <video> tag of your HTML code. For more on how to integrate a WebVTT file into an HTML video, check out this guide by html5doctor.com.

    If you are using WebVTT for a browser-based HTML video, there are some additional styling options available. You can control formatting such as bolding and italicizing by adding HTML and CSS tags to your transcript. Although InqScribe transcripts do not currently support styled text, you can still use tags in your transcript to specify how the text will appear in the video. Below are some examples of acceptable styling tags:

    <b>Make this bold</b>
    <i>Make this italic</i>
    <c.myclass>Apply CSS class "myclass"</c>
    <v Sue>Identify who is speaking</v>

    Note that WebVTT also supports a few custom position and display options not supported by InqScribe. Specifically, if you’d like subtitles to appear karaoke-style or control per-subtitle positioning, you’ll need to manually edit your exported WebVTT file with a text editor. You can read more about these limitations in our WebVTT User Guide entry here.

    For more technical information, head over to the WC3 Community Group report. If you have any questions or comments about using WebVTT, send us email at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Hard Coding Your Subtitles: Actually Not Hard

    Posted on April 1st, 2015 Alex No comments

    There are quite a few ways to creates subtitles in InqScribe (check out a list of them here). Using the built-in “Save Subtitled QuickTime Movie” option is probably the quickest and easiest, but if you or your colleagues don’t have access to QuickTime 7, sharing the exported video file can be a problem. If you’d like to ensure your subtitled movie plays the same across all devices, hard coding your subtitles may be the answer for you.

    “Hard coding” or “burning-in” subtitles means taking the subtitle track and writing it into the video itself. If a video file has burned-in subtitles, it ensures the video will look the same no matter how it’s played. Note that you won’t be able to toggle subtitles on or off; if they’re burned-in, they’re there for good. To be clear, you cannot use InqScribe to burn-in subtitles. You can, however, export your InqScribe transcript to a Subrip .srt file and use free online tools to create a video file with hard coded subtitles. In this post, I’ll explain how to use InqScribe with VidCoder and Submerge.

    First, you’ll need to create and prepare your InqScribe transcript. Once it’s ready, export as a Subrip .srt file by selecting “File > Export > Subrip Format…” Note the save location of the file- you’ll need to access it soon. Now that you have a subtitle file, it’s time to burn it into a copy of your source video. To do this, we’ll use the free VidCoder (Windows-only) and Submerge (Mac-only).

    VidCoder (Windows-only)

    VidCoder is a free, open source software that uses Handbrake as it’s encoding engine. Designed for DVD/Blu-Ray and video encoding, VidCoder also allows you to hard code your subtitles. Here’s how:

    1. Download VidCoder from their CodePlex website: https://vidcoder.codeplex.com.
    2. Install VidCoder by opening the executable file. It should be called something like “VidCoder-1.5.3.1-x64.exe.”
    3. Launch VidCoder. From the startup menu, select “Video File…” Locate your original source video and select “Open.” Note that you’ll want to load the source video, NOT a subtitled QuickTime movie created in InqScribe.
    4. Once the video loads into VidCoder, you’ll have a few more options. Under the “Subtitles” heading, select “Edit…” Then, select “Import .srt File” Locate your .srt file and click “Open.”
    5. You’ll see your subtitle file loaded into “External subtitles.” Make sure to check “Burn in” and then click “OK.”
    6. Now that you have your video and subtitle file loaded into VidCoder, select “Encode” in the bottom right of the menu. Once it’s finished, you should see the new encoded video file appear in your specified folder.

    Submerge (Mac-only)

    Submerge is a tool designed specifically for hard coding subtitles on Mac. You’ll find it comes with more options to adjust subtitle position and appearance than freeware like VidCoder, although Submerge has a price tag of $19. Fortunately, Submerge offers a free timed demo for new users to try out.

    Note that we are in no way affiliated with Submerge or its creator, but are simply offering it as a possible subtitle burn-in solution to InqScribe users.

    You can find more information about Submerge, including directions on how to get started at their website: http://www.bitfield.se/submerge.

    Do you use a different tool to hard code subtitles? If you have any recommendations, we’d love to hear from you. Likewise, if you have any questions about creating subtitles with InqScribe, just shoot us an email at support@inqscribe.

  • How to Add Captions to Facebook Videos

    Posted on October 8th, 2014 Alex No comments

    As you may or may not have noticed, Facebook has been making some improvements to its video feature. Part of this campaign includes newly added support for caption/subtitle display. Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Can I use InqScribe to add subtitles to my Facebook video?” The answer: yes, yes you can.

    Facebook video screenshot

    Here's what your subtitles will look like in Facebook

    The following process entails creating your transcript, exporting it to the Facebook-compatible Subrip .srt format, and finally uploading your video along with the .srt file to Facebook. Note that, at this time of writing (October 2014), adding captions is only available in the US for the English language, and it won’t work on mobile or tablet. This is subject to change as Facebook continues to develop their video features. In the likely event that Facebook alters their subtitling process, we’ll keep these instructions updated in our Knowledge Base here.

    Facebook is a little picky when it comes to the format of the Subrip .srt captions, so pay special attention your filename and line endings (see steps 3 and 4). With that in mind, here’s how to add in your captions:

    1. Open up InqScribe and prepare your transcript with text and timecodes.
    2. Once its ready, export your transcript as a Subrip .srt file by selecting “File > Export > Subrip Format.”
    3. Select a name for your file and specify its save location with the “Choose…” button. Here’s the important part: Facebook requires you to place “.en_US” at the end of your filename. So, your file will end up looking something like “Example.en_US.srt.”
    4. Now, in the Export Settings menu, click “Advanced” to bring up the Advanced Options. Set Line Endings to “Windows (CR/LF)” and click OK. Don’t forget this step! In our testing, Facebook will only accept Windows or Unix line endings.

      line endings screen shot

      Make sure to set Line Endings to "Windows (CR/LF)"

    5. Press OK and your Subrip .srt subtitle file will be saved in the location of your choosing.
    6. Now, login to Facebook and upload your video (instructions from Facebook here).
    7. Once you have located your video, select “Post” and the video will begin uploading. Then, select “Edit This Video.” You’ll be taken to the menu pictured below where you can add in your subtitle file.facebook video upload screenshot
    8. Under the Captions section, select “Choose File” and locate your Subrip .srt subtitle file.
    9. Select “Save” and the subtitles will be added to your video!
    10. To display subtitles, press the “CC” button at the bottom of the video player on playback.

    If you didn’t name the .srt file correctly, you’ll see the message “You uploaded a .SRT file with an incorrect filename. Please use this format: filename.en_US.srt”

    If you don’t see any subtitles after uploading your .srt file and clicking the “CC” button on the video player, then you might not have selected the correct line endings in step 4.

    You can also add subtitles to a video you’ve already uploaded. To do so, select the video and expand it. Click “Options > Edit This Video” at the bottom of the video player and refer to steps 7-9.

    Questions? Comments? Contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: A Final Cut Pro Workflow for Editing in Another Language

    Posted on May 7th, 2012 ben No comments

    Finding the right workflow for a project can be a challenge, especially when you have multiple languages, multiple tools, and multiple collaborators in the mix.  In our latest guest blog, Chad Braham, an editor and Director of Media Production at WORDonCancer.org describes in very helpful detail how they’ve developed a translation workflow that starts in Final Cut Pro and ends back in Final Cut Pro with a full resolution subtitled version that enables him to edit the film in a language he doesn’t speak.

    Got an interesting story about how you’re using InqScribe? Please contact us at support@inqscribe.com if you’d like to highlight your work.


    by Chad Braham, Editor, Director of Media Production, WORDonCancer.org

    WORDonCancer.org is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization based in Indianapolis, IN, that aims to educate and raise awareness about women’s cancer.

    This summer, our organization is working on a documentary short film about a cervical cancer prevention program in the Peten region of Guatemala, entitled, “No More <http://nomorethemovie.com/>. Due to the location of where the film was shot, a large portion of the footage needs to be translated and subtitled (from Spanish to English) for the final piece.

    Much of this translation is currently being done by a small group of volunteers, most of whom have little to no subtitling/transcription experience. Because of this, we needed a solution that was easy to learn and use, was available on multiple platforms (PC and Mac) and could work within our Final Cut Pro 7 video editing workflow.

    As you probably already know, Inqscribe <http://inqscribe.com/> does all the above and more. As the editor of this film, I must say that I don’t speak much spanish, so it was critical that our translation workflow start and end with Final Cut Pro. With Inqscribe I can edit spanish speaking interviews, in Final Cut Pro, with subtitles, and find sound bites and edit points as if I were editing an english speaking interview. Our typical workflow is as follows:

    1. Export a clip of spanish speaking footage from Final Cut Pro as a small reference video file with a timecode window burned in. In an attempt to keep the physical file size small (and the duration short for our volunteers) we usually keep the file to around 7 minutes long (a 320×180 Quicktime file at Photo-JPEG with “Medium” compression seem to play-back better then “.mp4” files on slower PC machines).

    2. Upload the file to our FTP site or Google Drive (depending on the volunteer’s preferences) and notify the volunteer with an email that also includes a few notes about the file (who the person speaking is, why we chose to talk to them, etc.)

    3. Volunteer transcribes in Inqscribe and breaks up the transcription into phrases with timecode for subtitling exports.

    4. The volunteer then emails over just the “.inqscr” file, that the video editor opens in his copy of InqScribe, makes a few adjustments to ensure it adheres to basic subtitling best practices (amount of text per subtitle, etc.), and then exports out an XML from InqScribe for Final Cut Pro import.

    5. The XML export is then imported into Final Cut Pro and sync’d to the full-rez version of the translated clip. This is really the beauty of translating and transcribing with Inqscribe, the translation is already broken into full-resolution subtitling text “slides” in FCP and can be edited further without any quality loss to the video or text.

    One of the biggest challenges of producing any documentary, is organizing the massive amounts of footage and material, into a compelling story. This is especially complicated when a good portion of the material you are working with is in a foreign language. Luckly, there is a software like InqScribe that is so easy, anyone can use it.

    You can learn about this film at the film’s website www.nomorethemovie.com.