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  • Guest Blog: Standing Up for Nature with InqScribe

    Posted on November 9th, 2017 Alex No comments

    Amidst a busy travel schedule around remote regions of Kenya, Hannah & Jamie rely on InqScribe to capture inspiring stories of wildlife conservation.

    By: Hannah Pollock and Jamie Unwin, filmmakers and founders of Stand Up For Nature

    We believe visual media and films are an incredible tool for education and sharing peoples stories, but how do you reach people that live in the most remote areas of our planet, without access to electricity? We’ve designed and built a bicycle-powered cinema and we’re taking it to the most remote communities in Kenya for a 5-month expedition with our nonprofit Stand Up for Nature. Our aim is to find and film inspirational stories from Kenyans on the ground, doing remarkable things to conserve wildlife in the face of adversity, poverty and civil unrest. We’ll then show these films on our bicycle cinema with the aim of inspiring other local Kenyans to help protect their amazing wildlife. Stand Up for Nature

    Transcribing our videos is an incredibly important part of our project. Ultimately, the target audience of our films will be Kenyans, so they need to be made in the local languages. With over 60 different languages spoken in Kenya this is very challenging, so we’ll be working closely with a translator to ensure that nothing is lost or misrepresented in the editing process.

    Due to the timing of our project, we’ll be sending our footage back to the UK for editing so that by the time we’ve finished shooting all of the inspirational stories, we’ll be able to move straight into showing the finished films on our bicycle cinema. InqScribe is invaluable to this process as it enables us to sit with a translator in Kenya and accurately transcribe all of our local interviews . We’ll then send this transcript back to the UK for our volunteer editors to reference. This will ensure we’re not missing any key phrases and know exactly what is being said at what time. Previously we’ve tried everything from writing out scripts by hand to recording a translator speaking English and trying to match it up. It hasn’t worked out great, which is why we’re excited to use InqScribe for this project.


    About the Authors

    Hannah and Jamie are two recent Zoology graduates from the University of Exeter. They started the nonprofit Stand Up for Nature three years ago to combine their passion for wildlife and filmmaking. Their goal is to give a platform for unsung heroes around the world to share their stories and inspire others to stand up and make a change for wildlife. You can learn more about their work at standupfornature.org.

  • Guest Blog: “No Elderly Left Behind”

    Posted on March 31st, 2017 Alex No comments

    By: Irene Herrera, director of the upcoming documentary “No Elderly Left Behind”

    As a documentary filmmaker, I need transcripts and lots of them. I am currently producing a documentary for NHK World on elderly isolation in Japan called “No Elderly Left Behind.” I travel throughout Asia and work in many languages, so I need a way to organize my transcripts and find a workflow for the fixers or translators that help me with the project. For this, InqScribe works like a charm.

    The Project

    Still from "No Elderly Left Behind."

    The number of seniors living alone is on the rise in graying Japan where 26.7% of the population is over 65 and life expectancy for women has reached a whooping average of 86.

    “No Elderly Left Behind” focuses on Yoshie Senda, a dedicated 80-year-old volunteer who is on a mission. For the past 16 years she has been working on rebuilding ties within her community as a collective effort to tackle elderly isolation in Adachi, a ward located in one of the most affected areas in northeastern Tokyo. As she tries her best to embrace her golden years, she relentlessly checks up on her peers to create a space where they can have fun and share their memories of pain and joy.

    Workflow

    I normally work together with 3-4 person crews. We transcribe in InqScribe, export to SubRip SRT, and then use the “title import” from Spherico to bring them into FCP X. I was initially editing and searching for soundbites in Premiere, but in the end settled on FCP X.

    What I love the most is being able to slow down the audio play rate so that you can type as you go. I also love the easy-to-use shortcuts, such as “Insert Timecode.” Before I discovered InqScribe, the translators and fixers I worked with had to manually input time codes and that was pretty painful.

    For transcriptions, InqScribe is my number one. I recommend it to my students whenever they need to do a lot of transcribing in my documentary class at Temple University Japan. For this, InqScribe works like a charm.

    Irene Herrera is a documentary filmmaker and professor at Temple University Japan. Learn more about Irene’s work at her website: ireneherrera.com.

    Thanks Irene! If you’re a documentary filmmaker interested in trying out InqScribe, feel free to request a 14-day trial from inqscribe.com. Otherwise, if you have any questions about InqScribe, feel free to contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: Capturing The Creative High

    Posted on September 2nd, 2016 Alex No comments

    The process of putting together a feature-length documentary can be daunting. Learn how Adriana uses InqScribe to wrangle together hours of footage.

    By: Adriana Marchione, director of the upcoming documentary The Creative High

    The Creative High

    Photo credit: Joseph Feusi

    I have been involved in the arts for over twenty-five years as a filmmaker, exhibiting visual artist, Argentine tango dancer, arts therapist and educator. My current project is a documentary feature film about artists who have faced addiction called The Creative High. It illustrates how musicians, visual artists, dancers and performers create art. The Creative High explores the highs and the lows of art-making and helps us understand more about the human condition from people who have experienced deep loss and disorientation due to addiction. The film is a testament to the chaotic and passionate nature of creativity, giving a voice to a range of experiences, memories and emotions.

    InqScribe has been a crucial part of our current phase of production. We are assessing our footage and reviewing all of the interviews of our artists by transcribing them. We have close to 20 hours of interview footage so far, and being able to use InqScribe to capture all the dialogue matched with timecodes has been a great time-saver and overall asset to The Creative High. Both my media intern and I will be able to make significant progress towards completing the transcription without hiring a costly transcriber.

    InqScribe is very simple and it has been easy to navigate. So far, my favorite thing about InqScribe is the customer service and all of the tutorials and FAQ on the website that take you step by step through the learning process. If I had known the value and ease in using a transcription software such as InqScribe I would have taken advantage of it in previous projects.

    Adriana_on_Set_Photo_Credit_Gareth_Gooch

    Photo credit: Gareth Gooch

    About the Author

    Adriana Marchione is the director of The Creative High film project. This is her second film, yet her experience as an artist spans 25 years with a background in photography and mixed media. Her interest in the topic of creativity and addiction comes from her own experience as an artist in recovery from alcoholism. Find more information about The Creative High at www.thecreativehigh.com.


    Thanks Adriana! If you have any questions about using InqScribe, feel free to contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: Global Collaboration Made Easy for Dalit Women Fight

    Posted on June 26th, 2015 Alex No comments

    The Dalit Women Fight crew uses InqScribe to translate footage for their feature-length documentary. Read about their work, and how InqScribe helps them cross language barriers.

    By: Thenmozhi Soundararajan, Director of Dalit Women Fight

    #Dalitwomenfight!

    Dalit Women Fight is a transmedia documentary that looks at the issue behind the rape epidemic in India: caste-based sexual violence. Dalit Women Fight braids the stories of three women as they move from despair to courage during the events surrounding the global Dalit Women’s Self-Respect Movement, a transnational campaign calling for an end to caste-based sexual violence.

    Dalit is a term that refers to South Asia’s Untouchable people, and the Dalit women at the heart of this film are leading India’s largest historical challenge to India’s rape and caste culture through the Dalit Women’s Self­-Respect March. The strategies used by the Dalit movement mirror the U.S. Freedom Rides, mashed-up with the Take Back the Night marches. The goal of our documentary is to educate others about the Dalit Women Fight Movement and to challenge the current systems of violence.

    InqScribe: Where Everything Comes Together

    We use InqScribe to translate footage from all over the world. In India alone we have over 12 languages, often from very inaccessible rural areas where the dialects are difficult to translate. InqScribe allows us to upload footage and tap into local leaders working remotely, who can then create vital transcripts that are used for editing and titling. Our volunteers translate Hindi, Bhojupuri, Marathi and Urdu reels of footage, working remotely in locations spanning from Haryana to Los Angeles. We recruit many different sets of eyes and ears looking to be involved in the production process. Without InqScribe, our process would be so much more tedious as there would be no single platform that can handle all the tasks that InqScribe lets us centralize.

    #Dalitwomenfight! from Thenmozhi on Vimeo.

    In the past, we used several programs, playing video with QuickTime or Windows Media Player and transcribing with Microsoft Word or Notepad. It was such a problem, due to the lack of time stamps, sound control boards and other necessary controls. InqScribe is a single tool. Dozens of our volunteers are able to accurately utilize it with little to no difficulty. Our workflow has expanded greatly, and we have been able to produce vital footage within our time-sensitive schedule. With InqScribe, we’re able to make the most of our translation production time and increase the translation quality by hiring qualified translators who can easily be given access to the tool.

    Our favorite feature is the timecode shortcut and the options for multiple export formats. Since our project is multi-layered and requires extensive editing and reviews, we are able to adequately connect translators with footage. InqScribe has been extremely easy to use for our multi-lingual translators who have little experience with translation software, and we are always impressed by the high quality production.


    Dalit Women FightAbout the Author

    Thenmozhi Soundararajan is a Dalit American transmedia artist/activist and the Director of the full-length documentary Dalit Women Fight.

    Thanks Sharmin! Learn more about Dalit Human Rights and caste-based violence at ncdhr.org.in/aidmam. For any questions or comments about InqScribe, shoot us an email at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: Using InqScribe for a Documentary on Native American Health

    Posted on March 4th, 2011 ben No comments

    We just love it when InqScribe is put to use for a worthy cause. As part of our ongoing series that highlights how our folks are using the tool, we’ve invited Kitty Farmer of Watersong Productions to tell us about her advocacy work for Native Americans, and how InqScribe helped streamline her workflow.

    Got an interesting story about how you’re using InqScribe? Please contact us at info@inquirum.net if you’d like to highlight your work.

    What’s In The Heart

    By Kitty Farmer, Watersong Productions, LLC

    I am an advocate/activist who is new to filmmaking. My first experience with transcribing was starting and stopping the DVD player on my computer! As anyone can imagine, this was laborious, tedious and took forever. Last summer, a colleague recommended Inquirum’s amazing software. After spending time with the product, I can say in all honesty, I love to transcribe! It’s truly a remarkable product. My director, Dustinn Craig, White Mountain Apache, who has had several films broadcast on PBS, was thrilled to learn about it when we spent time together filming this last weekend.

    Donald Warne, MD, MPH, Oglala Lakota (Chief collaborator with Kitty Farmer on film)
    Photo credit: Alejandro Lopez

    We use InqScribe to log our video footage, especially to transcribe interviews. The director uses these transcripts to make edit decisions. During editting, we use the timecodes embedded in the transcripts to be able to quickly jump to clips we want to review.

    Leonard Little Finger, great-great grandson of Chief Big Foot, Deanne Fitzmaurice
    Leonard Little Finger, Photo © Deanne Fitzmaurice

    We are producing a 20-minute trailer to Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) for a grant to create a documentary film to educate the general public and policy makers about the history and reasons why American Indians, despite treaties with the U.S. government that mandate basic social services, have the worst health disparities of any population in the nation. In addition, we highlight some remarkable people who through their resiliency and ingenuity have created programs and initiatives that are healing their communities. The film is sponsored by the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board (formerly the Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board).

    Help see the film finished: contribute on Indie Go Go

    Film Web Site: What’s in the Heart

    What’s in the Heart from Kitty Farmer on Vimeo.

    Kitty Farmer, Producer & Co-Director, What's in the Heart
    Kitty Farmer