InqScribe News

News and Notes related to Digital Media Transcription, Analysis, and Captioning.
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  • MacOS Mojave Support

    Posted on September 27th, 2018 Alex No comments

    With the recent release of macOS 10.14 Mojave, you may wonder, will InqScribe still work if I update? The answer is yes. InqScribe offers the same functionality on Mojave as it has with previous versions of macOS.

    There is no need to download a new version of InqScribe. The current release, version 2.2.4 is the most up-to-date, and we recommend it for users on any supported operating system. If you’re on an older version of InqScribe, or if you don’t have InqScribe installed, you can download version 2.2.4 free from our website here.

    As with the previous macOS High Sierra, you may see a message pop up when you first launch InqScribe about 32-bit apps becoming obsolete in the near future. In short, Apple has plans to drop support of 32-bit apps with the next major macOS release. While InqScribe remains 32-bit for now, the next version of InqScribe, being developed now, is a 64-bit version.

    If you have any questions or issues about InqScribe, you can contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Using InqScribe Labs for Additional File Formats

    Posted on July 25th, 2018 Alex No comments

    Did you know InqScribe offers access to more export formats than what’s in the app? Our InqScribe Labs website allows you to convert your InqScribe transcript into a few extra formats.

    InqScribe Labs

     

    What is InqScribe Labs? InqScribe Labs is website that gives users access to experimental new features. Currently, the site houses a few commonly requested exported formats that we’re working on adding into the InqScribe app.

     
    How do I use the extra formats? Prepare your transcript, upload the .inqscr file to one of the exporter pages, select your options (if applicable), and then click “download” to receive the converted file.

    The full list of exporters is available here. They include:
    You’ll find more detailed instructions on how to convert in the export format pages above. Please note that our converter is still experimental in nature and subject to change. If you have questions, feel free to email us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Working Around Discontinuous Timecodes

    Posted on April 6th, 2018 Alex No comments

    We often hear from users working with video that has a running timecode burned in to the video image. The most common issue is that the on-screen running timecode doesn’t match up with InqScribe’s default [00.00.00:00] starting point. You can easily resolve this by running a timecode adjustment. However, you may also have a gap in the middle of the footage that causes the on-screen timecode to becomes out of sync with InqScribe. A transcript with a gap like this is said to have discontinuous timecodes.

    The problem is that InqScribe can’t read the burned in running timecode and has no way of knowing about the gap. InqScribe bases its timecode on the total length of the video itself, not the on-screen footage that makes up the video.

    You can work around this limitation by offsetting your timecodes so that they match up after the gap. Note that this will effectively “break” the timecodes in your transcript. They will no longer be clickable and cannot be saved as a subtitled QuickTime Movie. With that said, it won’t affect your end results when exporting the transcript as a subtitle file, in formats like SubRip SRT, WebVTT, Plain Text, etc.

    Here’s what to do:

    1. Prepare your InqScribe transcript. Here’s a short sample text we’ll use for the purpose of demonstration:

    [02:17:58.00] John crosses the street
    [02:18:08.17] John enters a rickshaw
    [02:18:29.19] John exits the rickshaw

    2. Make a new copy of your transcript. This way, you have a backup to refer to in case you inadvertently make a mistake adjusting timecodes.

    3. Find the point in the video where there is a gap between the burned-in timecode and the corresponding timecode in your transcript. Click on the first timecode entered after this gap and note the burned in timecode that appears on screen. You’re going to subtract the value of the timecode written in InqScribe from the timecode burned into the video (or vice versa if there was a jump backwards in time). To make this easier, you may want to make use of this free timecode calculator from Michael Cinquin. (Tip: If you use this tool, make note of the timecode frame rate selector at the top of the calculator. This should match the frame rate of your InqScribe transcript. You can check the timecode frame rate of your InqScribe transcript in InqScribe’s Transcript > Transcript Settings menu. By default, it’s set to 30 fps.)

    In our example, let’s say we noticed a gap between the first entry at [02:17:58.00] and the second entry at [02:18:08.17]. When we click on [02:18:08.17], we notice the burned-in timecode shown below:

    Burned-in Timecode

    Since the timecode jumped forward, we take the on-screen value [03:19:09.18] minus the transcript value [02:18:08.17]. This comes out to a gap of [01:01:01.01].

    4. Highlight the affected region of your transcript, from the offset point through the end of your transcript, and select “Transcript > Adjust Timecodes”. Select “Add” (or “Subtract” if there was a jump backwards in time) and enter the number you got from your earlier subtraction. Based on our example, we’ll enter [01:01:01.01]. Check “Adjust Selection Only” and click OK.

    5. You should now see the selected timecodes match up with the running on-screen time. If you find another gap in your running timecode later in the transcript, you can repeat the process as needed.
    Here’s how our sample text turned out:

    [02:17:58.00] John crosses the street
    [03:19:09.18] John enters a rickshaw
    [03:19:30.20] John exits the rickshaw

    If something didn’t go right, make sure to check that the timecode frame rate of your video, your InqScribe transcript, and the timecode calculator tool (if used) all match. Otherwise, if you have questions about InqScribe, you can contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

     

  • InqScribe 2.2.4 Released

    Posted on February 15th, 2018 Alex No comments

    We’ve just released InqScribe version 2.2.4, a minor update that addresses a few bugs. Here’s the full list of changes:

    • The export submenu now includes a link to labs.inqscribe.com, which offers some export formats beyond what the app provides.
    • Exported file names are now based on the document name instead of defaulting to “export”.
    • Preserve the state of the Anti-Alias checkbox when iterating on a subtitled movie export.
    • Minor documentation updates.
    • Better support for licenses whose owner names include accents and other non-ASCII characters.
    • Updated to support evaluation licenses that expire in 2018 and beyond.

    You can download the free update at inqscribe.com/download.  Note that evaluation licenses will require version 2.2.4 from here on out. For help with installation, head over to our article “How do I install InqScribe?

    For those of you eager for a more substantial release, rest assured we have bigger changes in store this year. If you have any questions about version 2.2.4, send an email to us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: Standing Up for Nature with InqScribe

    Posted on November 9th, 2017 Alex No comments

    Amidst a busy travel schedule around remote regions of Kenya, Hannah & Jamie rely on InqScribe to capture inspiring stories of wildlife conservation.

    By: Hannah Pollock and Jamie Unwin, filmmakers and founders of Stand Up For Nature

    We believe visual media and films are an incredible tool for education and sharing peoples stories, but how do you reach people that live in the most remote areas of our planet, without access to electricity? We’ve designed and built a bicycle-powered cinema and we’re taking it to the most remote communities in Kenya for a 5-month expedition with our nonprofit Stand Up for Nature. Our aim is to find and film inspirational stories from Kenyans on the ground, doing remarkable things to conserve wildlife in the face of adversity, poverty and civil unrest. We’ll then show these films on our bicycle cinema with the aim of inspiring other local Kenyans to help protect their amazing wildlife. Stand Up for Nature

    Transcribing our videos is an incredibly important part of our project. Ultimately, the target audience of our films will be Kenyans, so they need to be made in the local languages. With over 60 different languages spoken in Kenya this is very challenging, so we’ll be working closely with a translator to ensure that nothing is lost or misrepresented in the editing process.

    Due to the timing of our project, we’ll be sending our footage back to the UK for editing so that by the time we’ve finished shooting all of the inspirational stories, we’ll be able to move straight into showing the finished films on our bicycle cinema. InqScribe is invaluable to this process as it enables us to sit with a translator in Kenya and accurately transcribe all of our local interviews . We’ll then send this transcript back to the UK for our volunteer editors to reference. This will ensure we’re not missing any key phrases and know exactly what is being said at what time. Previously we’ve tried everything from writing out scripts by hand to recording a translator speaking English and trying to match it up. It hasn’t worked out great, which is why we’re excited to use InqScribe for this project.


    About the Authors

    Hannah and Jamie are two recent Zoology graduates from the University of Exeter. They started the nonprofit Stand Up for Nature three years ago to combine their passion for wildlife and filmmaking. Their goal is to give a platform for unsung heroes around the world to share their stories and inspire others to stand up and make a change for wildlife. You can learn more about their work at standupfornature.org.

  • Guest Blog: “No Elderly Left Behind”

    Posted on March 31st, 2017 Alex No comments

    By: Irene Herrera, director of the upcoming documentary “No Elderly Left Behind”

    As a documentary filmmaker, I need transcripts and lots of them. I am currently producing a documentary for NHK World on elderly isolation in Japan called “No Elderly Left Behind.” I travel throughout Asia and work in many languages, so I need a way to organize my transcripts and find a workflow for the fixers or translators that help me with the project. For this, InqScribe works like a charm.

    The Project

    Still from "No Elderly Left Behind."

    The number of seniors living alone is on the rise in graying Japan where 26.7% of the population is over 65 and life expectancy for women has reached a whooping average of 86.

    “No Elderly Left Behind” focuses on Yoshie Senda, a dedicated 80-year-old volunteer who is on a mission. For the past 16 years she has been working on rebuilding ties within her community as a collective effort to tackle elderly isolation in Adachi, a ward located in one of the most affected areas in northeastern Tokyo. As she tries her best to embrace her golden years, she relentlessly checks up on her peers to create a space where they can have fun and share their memories of pain and joy.

    Workflow

    I normally work together with 3-4 person crews. We transcribe in InqScribe, export to SubRip SRT, and then use the “title import” from Spherico to bring them into FCP X. I was initially editing and searching for soundbites in Premiere, but in the end settled on FCP X.

    What I love the most is being able to slow down the audio play rate so that you can type as you go. I also love the easy-to-use shortcuts, such as “Insert Timecode.” Before I discovered InqScribe, the translators and fixers I worked with had to manually input time codes and that was pretty painful.

    For transcriptions, InqScribe is my number one. I recommend it to my students whenever they need to do a lot of transcribing in my documentary class at Temple University Japan. For this, InqScribe works like a charm.

    Irene Herrera is a documentary filmmaker and professor at Temple University Japan. Learn more about Irene’s work at her website: ireneherrera.com.

    Thanks Irene! If you’re a documentary filmmaker interested in trying out InqScribe, feel free to request a 14-day trial from inqscribe.com. Otherwise, if you have any questions about InqScribe, feel free to contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: Capturing The Creative High

    Posted on September 2nd, 2016 Alex No comments

    The process of putting together a feature-length documentary can be daunting. Learn how Adriana uses InqScribe to wrangle together hours of footage.

    By: Adriana Marchione, director of the upcoming documentary The Creative High

    The Creative High

    Photo credit: Joseph Feusi

    I have been involved in the arts for over twenty-five years as a filmmaker, exhibiting visual artist, Argentine tango dancer, arts therapist and educator. My current project is a documentary feature film about artists who have faced addiction called The Creative High. It illustrates how musicians, visual artists, dancers and performers create art. The Creative High explores the highs and the lows of art-making and helps us understand more about the human condition from people who have experienced deep loss and disorientation due to addiction. The film is a testament to the chaotic and passionate nature of creativity, giving a voice to a range of experiences, memories and emotions.

    InqScribe has been a crucial part of our current phase of production. We are assessing our footage and reviewing all of the interviews of our artists by transcribing them. We have close to 20 hours of interview footage so far, and being able to use InqScribe to capture all the dialogue matched with timecodes has been a great time-saver and overall asset to The Creative High. Both my media intern and I will be able to make significant progress towards completing the transcription without hiring a costly transcriber.

    InqScribe is very simple and it has been easy to navigate. So far, my favorite thing about InqScribe is the customer service and all of the tutorials and FAQ on the website that take you step by step through the learning process. If I had known the value and ease in using a transcription software such as InqScribe I would have taken advantage of it in previous projects.

    Adriana_on_Set_Photo_Credit_Gareth_Gooch

    Photo credit: Gareth Gooch

    About the Author

    Adriana Marchione is the director of The Creative High film project. This is her second film, yet her experience as an artist spans 25 years with a background in photography and mixed media. Her interest in the topic of creativity and addiction comes from her own experience as an artist in recovery from alcoholism. Find more information about The Creative High at www.thecreativehigh.com.


    Thanks Adriana! If you have any questions about using InqScribe, feel free to contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • How to Insert Quick, Marker-style Snippets

    Posted on August 23rd, 2016 Alex No comments

    One of our users recently asked if it was possible to insert Final Cut Pro-style markers into their InqScribe transcript. Although InqScribe doesn’t support true Final Cut Pro markers yet, you can create a custom Snippet to quickly insert a short note about a video.

    As an example, let’s say you want to note every time the video changes perspective to the second camera. We can create a Snippet that inserts the current timecode, the text “CAMERA 2”, and then the out timecode 1 second later.

    Obama Video Camera 2

    Here’s how:

    1. Open up your InqScribe transcript and select “Edit > Edit Snippets”
    2. In the Edit Snippets menu, click “Add” and enter a name for your new creation. “Marker 1” will do.
    3. Select a trigger key for your Snippet. Make sure to set it to an available trigger key (see this article for some suggestions). You could set it to Ctrl-Shift-; or Command-Shift-; if you’re already accustomed to using the Ctrl-; or Command-; shortcut combination to insert timecodes.
    4. Enter the following into the Snippet text area and then click “Done”:
      {$time} CAMERA 2 {$time_offset(00:00:01.00)}

    Once you press the Snippet’s trigger, it will output to the following (assuming pressed 23 seconds into the video):

    [00:00:23.00] CAMERA 2 [00:00:24.00]

    If you want to adjust the amount of time the out timecode is “offset” from the in timecode, you can adjust the value in the parenthesis. More Snippet variables are listed in our User Guide here.

    WARNING: Watch out for overlapping timecodes. The out timecode of the first subtitle must come before the in timecode of the next subtitle. In the example above, if you have a timecode that’s placed less than a second after the previous one, it would cause timecode overlap. If overlap occurs, you won’t be able to export your transcript properly.

    If you have questions about Snippets, or about InqScribe in general, feel free to contact us at support@inqscribe.com. We’re always happy to hear from our users.

  • Windows QuickTime Vulnerabilities

    Posted on April 21st, 2016 Alex No comments

    By now, you may have heard about the security vulnerabilities posed by QuickTime for Windows.  Given the security vulnerabilities, if you’re a Windows user, we highly recommend uninstalling QuickTime.

    What does this mean for Windows InqScribe users?

    1. You will still be able to play and transcribe most media that Windows Media Player supports.  For more about the types of files supported by Windows Media Player, head over to our media format guide here.
    2. Unfortunately, you will not be able to export a subtitled QuickTime movie using the QuickTime 7-exclusive “Save Subtitled QuickTime Movie” feature.

    Currently, InqScribe requires either QuickTime or Windows Media Player to play back audio and video files. You do not need QuickTime to run InqScribe on Windows–you can still use Windows Media Player for most files.  If you choose to uninstall QuickTime, InqScribe will automatically switch over to Windows Media Player. As long as your media files are supported by Windows Media Player, InqScribe will be able to play them as it normally does, and you may not notice any difference.

    How Do I Make Subtitled Videos Without QuickTime?

    Since you won’t be able to use InqScribe’s built-in subtitled QuickTime movie feature without QuickTime, you may need to find a new method of creating movies from your transcript. Luckily, there are a number of different subtitling options available to InqScribe users via Windows Media Player, VLC Player, YouTube, Final Cut Pro, etc. For more about these options, check out our “What are the different ways to create a subtitled video?” article.

    Why Does InqScribe Still Use QuickTime?

    When InqScribe debuted 10 years ago, QuickTime was arguably in its prime. QuickTime supports a range of media files, and through subtitle track support, giving our users a straightforward way to produce standalone subtitled movies. We’ve been very happy with the relationship between InqScribe and QuickTime, but the writing is on the wall: QuickTime is now over 20 years old, an eternity in software terms. With these vulnerabilities public, and Apple no longer supporting the software, it’s clear that QuickTime is no longer the way moving forward.

    Taking all of this into account, we’ve decided that future versions of InqScribe will no longer use QuickTime.

    What’s Next for InqScribe?

    We are currently working on a major overhaul of InqScribe.

    For OS X, InqScribe will use AV Foundation for media playback. AV Foundation is Apple’s official replacement for QuickTime and offers decent subtitle support. AV Foundation has the additional feature that it is also used for media playback on iPhones and iPads, so moving to AVFoundation should simplify the process of producing subtitled content for Apple’s mobile devices.

    For Windows, InqScribe could probably get by continuing to rely on Windows Media Player, but we want to look closely at moving to either DirectShow or its modern successor, Media Foundation. Of these options we’d prefer to use DirectShow, because Media Foundation doesn’t yet have strong support for subtitles. (Unlike Apple and QuickTime, Microsoft continues to support DirectShow).

    Beyond the native media engines for OS X and Windows, we are also looking at whether InqScribe can support alternative media engines that would enable playback of additional media formats or provide additional functionality that the native engines lack. Examples of engines in this class include VLC, GStreamer, and web-based solutions to play back online content like YouTube or Vimeo.

    InqScribe will continue to export a wide range of subtitling formats, and we will make sure that it will continue to be easy to generate subtitled content that can be viewed with standard apps on OS X and Windows. It’s worth noting that moving to more modern media playback engines will mean that future versions of InqScribe will not run on some older systems. You can read more about future system requirements here.

    We hope this helps to clarify our direction moving forward. In the meantime, InqScribe will continue to rely on QuickTime and Windows Media Player. If you have any questions InqScribe, feel free to contact us at support@inqscribe.com.

  • Guest Blog: Refugee Stories

    Posted on March 11th, 2016 Alex No comments

    By now, you’re surely heard news of the “refugee crisis” affecting countries across the globe. Did you know that InqScribe is used in the field to document the stories of these refugees?

    By: Karl Schembri, Regional Media Advisor in the Middle East for the Norwegian Refugee Council

    Newly displaced Syrian refugees

    Newly displaced Syrian refugees

    As a humanitarian NGO, we respond to crises around the world. My job and that of my colleagues in the media department of the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) is to collect stories from among the millions of refugees and the internally displaced—from Syria to Yemen, from Iraq to Palestine—it is always innocent civilians who end up suffering the most and our job is to tell their stories and try to influence change on the ground as well as on the decision tables.

    I came across InqScribe during a particularly stressful time when we were rushing to gather as many filmed interviews as possible with very little backup for transcriptions and time coding. After looking frantically online for software that could help me with the task, I came across the InqScribe trial version and I was immediately hooked to it because of its versatility, ease, and friendliness. InqScribe has made the entire process of transcribing and timecoding so much easier for our staff dealing with real crises and emergencies where every little bit of help is essential. Now, with InqScribe, we can focus on the content and quality.

    Having the option to save QuickTime videos with subtitles is a great way to share draft rushes without going through the entire editing process. It helps a lot especially when there are translations involved and we need to double check interviews, making sure the right words are transcribed and translated at the right time, etc. Overall, it is a very useful feature that I love.

    Check out the NRC photo gallery below to see the lives of these refugees:

    Thanks Karl! If any readers out there are “looking frantically online” for the right transcription software, feel free to request a free 14-day trial of InqScribe. If, like Karl, you work at a nonprofit or academic institution, we offer 30% discount (details here) off your InqScribe purchase.

    Questions? Comments about this article? Contact us at support@inqscribe.com.