News and Notes related to Digital Media Transcription, Analysis, and Captioning.
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  • How to Insert Quick, Marker-style Snippets

    Posted on August 23rd, 2016 Alex No comments

    One of our users recently asked if it was possible to insert Final Cut Pro-style markers into their InqScribe transcript. Although InqScribe doesn’t support true Final Cut Pro markers yet, you can create a custom Snippet to quickly insert a short note about a video.

    As an example, let’s say you want to note every time the video changes perspective to the second camera. We can create a Snippet that inserts the current timecode, the text “CAMERA 2”, and then the out timecode 1 second later.

    Obama Video Camera 2

    Here’s how:

    1. Open up your InqScribe transcript and select “Edit > Edit Snippets”
    2. In the Edit Snippets menu, click “Add” and enter a name for your new creation. “Marker 1” will do.
    3. Select a trigger key for your Snippet. Make sure to set it to an available trigger key (see this article for some suggestions). You could set it to Ctrl-Shift-; or Command-Shift-; if you’re already accustomed to using the Ctrl-; or Command-; shortcut combination to insert timecodes.
    4. Enter the following into the Snippet text area and then click “Done”:
      {$time} CAMERA 2 {$time_offset(00:00:01.00)}

    Once you press the Snippet’s trigger, it will output to the following (assuming pressed 23 seconds into the video):

    [00:00:23.00] CAMERA 2 [00:00:24.00]

    If you want to adjust the amount of time the out timecode is “offset” from the in timecode, you can adjust the value in the parenthesis. More Snippet variables are listed in our User Guide here.

    WARNING: Watch out for overlapping timecodes. The out timecode of the first subtitle must come before the in timecode of the next subtitle. In the example above, if you have a timecode that’s placed less than a second after the previous one, it would cause timecode overlap. If overlap occurs, you won’t be able to export your transcript properly.

    If you have questions about Snippets, or about InqScribe in general, feel free to contact us at We’re always happy to hear from our users.

  • How to Convert an Audio File

    Posted on October 16th, 2015 Alex No comments

    Have you ever come across an audio file that won’t play in InqScribe? Although InqScribe supports a wide variety of formats (generally anything that will play in QuickTime 7 or Windows Media player 11), one day you may run into an audio file that won’t play correctly. If this happens, don’t panic, you can usually resolve the problem by converting or transcoding the file.

    There are a few possible reasons why the file won’t play correctly. For example, it may be in an unsupported container or contain unsupported codecs. Converting the file will rewrite its data into a new, hopefully more legible format for InqScribe. In this article, I’ll explain how to convert/transcode an audio file using the free, open source software Audacity.

    Remember, converting or transcoding involves decoding the original file, and then encoding the file into a new format. It’s not quite as simple as renaming a file “Example.wma” to “Example.mp3.” If you’re totally confused, check out our blog post “What is a Codec Anyway?” for an explanation of codecs, containers, transcoding, and more. If you have a video file you need to convert, head over to our “Video Conversion Tools” article.

    Audacity screenshot

    Converting with Audacity 

    Audacity is something of a standard in the audio world. Although many use it to record and edit audio, you can also use it to convert or transcode files.

    The first step will be downloading and installing Audacity (available here: Audacity is a free, open source software available for Mac and PC. It is unaffiliated with InqScribe. Once you have it ready, here’s what to do:

    1. Launch Audacity and select “File > Import > Audio”. Choose the file you’d like to convert and click Open.
    2. Audacity will begin loading the file. Once loaded, you should see at least one blue waveform appear on screen
    3. Select “File > Export Audio.” Here, you’ll be given some options. You’ll want to first choose a name and save location for your converted file. Then, select the format for the new file. To maximize compatibility, we generally recommend the MP3 format.
    4. If you want more control over the quality (the default is 128 kbps) and bit rate, you can customize your settings by selecting the “Options” button.
    5. Once you have the settings to your liking, select “Save.”
    6. Audacity will then prompt you to “Edit Metadata”. Here, you can enter artist name, track title, album title, etc. This is primarily useful for music files. Feel free to leave these columns blank– they are not necessary.
    7. Click “OK” and Audacity will convert the file.

    That’s it! Now load the new file into InqScribe (either by dragging it into the media window or by clicking “Select Media Source”) and transcribe away.

    If you still can’t get the file to play correctly, or if you have any questions for us, feel free to send an email to

  • Speedy Shortcut Configurations

    Posted on February 17th, 2015 Alex No comments

    One of the easiest ways to speed up your transcription process is to setup shortcuts. You don’t have to be a professional transcriptionist to reap the benefits of quick-access commands. Whether you’re a newbie, a casual user, or aspiring to become InqScribe elite, improving your shortcut (and snippet) setup will help center your focus on the transcript, rather than on controlling media.

    To be clear, InqScribe already has some shortcuts pre-loaded. Your operating system also uses designates certain keys for system-wide shortcuts. We’ve listed these in-use shortcuts and suggested some available trigger keys in this Knowledge Base article. To sum it up, here’s what you’ll want to avoid:

    • Key combinations that are already in use by your system (system defaults)
    • Key combinations that are already in use by InqScribe (InqScribe defaults)
    • Keys that you’re likely to type in your transcript.

    To help get you started, we’ve created two sample configurations- one simple, one more advanced. These configurations should work on most systems, so you won’t have to worry about any of the conflicts described above.

    A Simple Shortcut Configuration

    If you don’t have much experience transcribing, here’s a setup that will be easy to learn:

    Cue Shortcut

    Tab Play/Pause (default)
    Ctrl/Command-Tab Skipback 8 seconds (default)
    Ctrl/Command-0 Insert current time
    Ctrl/Command-9 Cue
    Ctrl/Command-8 Review


    The idea is that these shortcuts are kept simple and are located within your field of vision, unobstructed by your hands. Even for beginners, we recommend using Cue and Review as opposed to Fast Forward and Rewind- it’s simply easier to control. In case you’re not familiar, the “Cue” command is essentially a modified Fast Forward. The media will play forwards at a speed of your choice until the trigger key is released, at which point it will resume playing. The “Review” command functions in the same way as
    a Rewind.

    An Advanced Shortcut Configuration

    After getting more acquainted with InqScribe, you may wish to incorporate more shortcuts and revamp your setup. Here’s a sample configuration for a more advanced user:

    Tab Play/Pause (default)
    Ctrl/Command-Tab Skipback 8 seconds (default)
    Ctrl/Command-0 Insert current time
    Ctrl/Command-9 Cue
    Ctrl/Command-8 Review
    Ctrl/Command-[ Change Play Rate -0.1x
    Ctrl/Command-] Change Play Rate 0.1x
    Ctrl/Command-J Go To Previous Timecode
    Ctrl/Command-L Go To Next Timecode


    Generally, the less you have to take your hands off the keyboard, the faster you can type. This shortcut setup will give you more independence from your mouse. One important addition is the ability to fine-tune the play rate to match your typing speed. The Go To Previous Timecode and Go To Next Timecode shortcuts now allow you to quickly review your timecode placement, which is crucial if you plan on creating subtitles from your transcript.

    Note this setup leaves Ctrl/Command-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 open for custom snippets.

    If you use shortcuts with other programs in your workflow, you might try configuring InqScribe to match them. For an example, check out this previous blog entry about adopting Final Cut Pro/Avid shortcuts.

    Although the ideal setup will vary from user to user, these shortcut configurations should give you an idea of how to optimize your InqScribe experience. If you have any shortcut tips you’d like to share with other InqScribe users, send an email to

  • How to Add Captions to Facebook Videos

    Posted on October 8th, 2014 Alex No comments

    As you may or may not have noticed, Facebook has been making some improvements to its video feature. Part of this campaign includes newly added support for caption/subtitle display. Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Can I use InqScribe to add subtitles to my Facebook video?” The answer: yes, yes you can.

    Facebook video screenshot

    Here's what your subtitles will look like in Facebook

    The following process entails creating your transcript, exporting it to the Facebook-compatible Subrip .srt format, and finally uploading your video along with the .srt file to Facebook. Note that, at this time of writing (October 2014), adding captions is only available in the US for the English language, and it won’t work on mobile or tablet. This is subject to change as Facebook continues to develop their video features. In the likely event that Facebook alters their subtitling process, we’ll keep these instructions updated in our Knowledge Base here.

    Facebook is a little picky when it comes to the format of the Subrip .srt captions, so pay special attention your filename and line endings (see steps 3 and 4). With that in mind, here’s how to add in your captions:

    1. Open up InqScribe and prepare your transcript with text and timecodes.
    2. Once its ready, export your transcript as a Subrip .srt file by selecting “File > Export > Subrip Format.”
    3. Select a name for your file and specify its save location with the “Choose…” button. Here’s the important part: Facebook requires you to place “.en_US” at the end of your filename. So, your file will end up looking something like “”
    4. Now, in the Export Settings menu, click “Advanced” to bring up the Advanced Options. Set Line Endings to “Windows (CR/LF)” and click OK. Don’t forget this step! In our testing, Facebook will only accept Windows or Unix line endings.

      line endings screen shot

      Make sure to set Line Endings to "Windows (CR/LF)"

    5. Press OK and your Subrip .srt subtitle file will be saved in the location of your choosing.
    6. Now, login to Facebook and upload your video (instructions from Facebook here).
    7. Once you have located your video, select “Post” and the video will begin uploading. Then, select “Edit This Video.” You’ll be taken to the menu pictured below where you can add in your subtitle file.facebook video upload screenshot
    8. Under the Captions section, select “Choose File” and locate your Subrip .srt subtitle file.
    9. Select “Save” and the subtitles will be added to your video!
    10. To display subtitles, press the “CC” button at the bottom of the video player on playback.

    If you didn’t name the .srt file correctly, you’ll see the message “You uploaded a .SRT file with an incorrect filename. Please use this format:”

    If you don’t see any subtitles after uploading your .srt file and clicking the “CC” button on the video player, then you might not have selected the correct line endings in step 4.

    You can also add subtitles to a video you’ve already uploaded. To do so, select the video and expand it. Click “Options > Edit This Video” at the bottom of the video player and refer to steps 7-9.

    Questions? Comments? Contact us at

  • Video Conversion Tools

    Posted on October 2nd, 2014 Alex No comments

    Sometimes you go to transcribe your video in InqScribe only to find that InqScribe won’t play that video type. InqScribe relies on the QuickTime 7 or Windows Media Player 11 specs for media playback, and is able to play most anything that can be played in those players. But if your media is not supported by either of those two players, you’ll need to convert it to a format that is.

    Converting, or transcoding, involves decoding the original file, and then encoding the file into a new format. It’s not quite as simple as renaming a file “Example.avi” to Example.mp4.” If you’re totally confused, check out our blog post “What is a Codec Anyway?” for an explanation of codecs, containers, transcoding, and more.

    After a quick Google search for “media conversion tool,” you’ll soon realize that there are a lot of options out there. Some of these tools will be more useful to you than others, and some might even install unwanted malware on your computer. Which one should you use? While we don’t endorse any single media converter, here are a few that have worked for us (and our users) in the past:

    HandBrake is a well-known, trusted, and free conversion software available for Mac, PC, and Linux. Since it’s a software, you won’t need to upload or download your video to a website (unlike Online-Convert below). Everything is done locally on your machine and you don’t need an internet connect to convert files. HandBrake supports batch file processing, which comes in handy if you’re planning on converting multiple media files. The drawback is that video conversion is limited to MP4 and MKV outputs. However, if your goal is to convert a video into an InqScribe-compatible format, the MP4 container will work just fine. Here’s a simple step-by-step guide to HandBrake:

    1. Download and install HandBrake from their website.
    2. Open HandBrake and click “Source” in the upper left portion of the window. Select the video or audio file you wish to convert. For example, “Desktop > Documents > My Videos >”
    3. Select where you’d like to save the new transcoded file by clicking “Browse” in the Destination section. By leaving it blank, it will save automatically to your desktop.
    4. Select the Container of the transcoded file. For video, you’ll have two options, MP4 and MKV. MP4 will work best with InqScribe.
    5. Next, in the bottom half of the HandBrake window, you’ll be able to edit various settings such as the frame rate, bit rate, and codecs of your media file. Adjust them to your liking.
    6. Click “Start” and your file will begin converting. HandBrake will notify you when the converted file is finished. It will then appear in the location of your choosing.

    Online-Convert is a relatively new conversion tool that is gaining some traction. This website supports a wide variety of formats and, best of all, using the website doesn’t require you to install any software. The only thing you’ll download from Online-Convert is your converted media file. Note that, as a web-based converter, this option requires you to upload your video to the Online-Convert server. If you have a very large file and/or a poor internet connection, this option may not be the best for you. As per their terms of service, all uploaded files are deleted from the Online-Convert database within 24 hours, though even this policy may be an issue if your files are confidential.  Here’s how the site works:

    1. From the homepage, select your converter and file type. For example, “Video converter > Convert to AVI.”
    2. You will then be taken to a new page where you can adjust your  media settings. First, upload your original media file by selecting “Choose files…” You can also convert files from a URL or directly from a DropBox account. Going along with our example, you might select “Desktop > My Documents > Videos >”
    3. Adjust the settings to your liking. These settings will vary depending on whether you’re converting audio or video, but know that you’ll have the option to specify the audio/video quality, bit rate, frame rate, and length of your media file.
    4. Once you’ve chosen your settings, select “Convert file” to proceed. You should see a green bar appear indicating the progress of your upload.
    5. When the upload is complete, you will be taken to a new page with the text “Your file has been successfully converted.” Your converted file will automatically begin downloading. Soon you will have your converted media file ready to go! In my case, I received “SampleVideo.avi” in my Downloads folder.

    Do you use a different media conversion tool? We’d be happy to hear your thoughts and suggestions. Email us at

  • Play a Subtitled Movie with Windows Media Player

    Posted on September 22nd, 2014 Alex No comments

    You can easily create Subtitled QuickTime Movies directly in InqScribe, and in general we recommend using QuickTime with InqScribe. However, there is another method to play a subtitled movie by combining your video with an exported subtitle track in Windows Media Player. How you ask? Windows Media Player doesn’t natively support subtitle importation, so we’ll be using the DirectVobSub add-on.

    Before proceeding, note that you’ll need to download and install the freeware DirectVobSub media codec, hosted by free-codecs here: DirectVobSub is an unofficial add-on that allows Windows Media Player to read external subtitles files such as subrip .srt, which you can create through InqScribe. Be aware that, depending on your version of Windows, adding subtitles with DirectVobSub is limited to .avi files (see below for more info).

    This option isn’t for everyone, and we’d like to point out that DirectVobSub is a third-party, unofficial add-on. We don’t support it, and your mileage may vary. That said, it is a quick and easy way to display subtitles without installing an additional media player.

    Here’s what to do:

    1. Prepare your transcript in InqScribe
    2. Export your transcript as a Subrip .srt file by selecting “File > Export > Subrip Format…”
    3. You’ll see the Export Settings menu. In the Target section, you’ll have the option to name your .srt file. It is important to give this .srt file the same title as the video you’re subtitling. For example, if your video is titled “My Subtitled Movie_123.avi” you should name your exported .srt file “My Subtitled” It is also important to save your .srt file in the same folder as the video you’re subtitling. You can specify the file’s location with the “Choose…” button in the same Export Settings menu. So, if your video file is located in a folder called “My Favorite Videos” make sure to save the .srt file in the same place.
    4. Download the DirectVobSub media codec, hosted for free by free-codecs here:
    5. Install DirectVobSub by double clicking on the .exe file you downloaded. It should be called something like: “VSFilter_2.41.322.exe”
    6. Once it’s finished installing, open up the video file you wish to subtitle in Windows Media Player. Bring up the menu by pressing the “Alt” key, and select “Play > Lyrics, captions, and subtitles > On if available”
    7. Your video will now display the subtitles you created in InqScribe!

    Note that there are a few restrictions to using DirectVobSub and Windows Media Player for subtitle display:

    • Although this method will work with .avi video files, it won’t work with the common mp4 file type on Windows 7 and up. This is because DirectVobSub relies on DirectShow to display subtitles, but later versions of Windows use Media Foundation, rather than DirectShow, to decode mp4 files. On Windows Vista and lower, however, mp4 files are decoded with DirectShow. So, on earlier versions of Windows you should be able to use DirectVobSub to add in your subtitle track to mp4 files.
    • Be aware that you won’t have any control over the appearance of your subtitles. They will appear “flush with bottom” (near the bottom of the screen), centered, and white with black outlines and drop shadow. In other words, they will look close to how it would look in a film.

    Do you have experience using DirectVobSub with other file types? Do you use an entirely different method to add subtitles to video with Windows Media Player? Let us know! Contact us at

  • Creating a Transcript with InqScribe and Dragon NaturallySpeaking

    Posted on September 12th, 2014 Alex No comments

    When we’re asked about speech recognition software, it’s often from new users hoping to automate their transcription process. Although InqScribe doesn’t include any speech recognition technology, you can easily use InqScribe in conjunction with other speech-to-text software.

    Dragon NaturallySpeaking is the most popular speech recognition product on the market. “Dragon” has been around for over 17 years, with version 13.0 recently released for PC by Nuance Communications. For Mac users, there’s also an OS X edition called Dragon Dictate. In this article however, we’ll be looking at Dragon NaturallySpeaking 12 Home Edition.

    As you might guess, Dragon essentially converts your voice into text, also allowing for command triggers such as “Open My Documents” and “Delete Line.” Although true transcription automation isn’t quite there yet, you can use Dragon effectively with your own voice.

    Automatic Transcription

    Wouldn’t it be great if a program could listen to audio and create an exact text of the recording? Well, in reality it’s a little more complicated. Before digging into Dragon, it’s worth laying out some of the difficulties of automatic transcription:

    1. Computers have a hard time distinguishing a single voice from the noise and general messiness of most recordings. There are often ambient sounds or background chatter in even the most pure recordings.
    2. It’s difficult for speech recognition programs to remain accurate moving from speaker-to-speaker. Everyone’s voice sounds a little different, so programs like Dragon work best by training with and focusing on one voice.
    3. Even in ideal conditions, speech recognition isn’t perfect. It’s never going to be 100% accurate because it mishears you or maybe it just doesn’t understand a colloquial word. A lot of what we “hear” from language comes from context and nuances in our speech and body language. Speech recognition technology just isn’t advanced enough to pick up on such complex information.

    So, if you’re still interested in trying out automation, the Pro and Legal Editions of Dragon 12 support speech-to-text conversation from audio recordings (click here for a PDF comparison of these editions). This feature is intended to work only with your own, trained voice due to the limitations explained above. However, there’s nothing stopping you from trying out the voice recognition on multiple speakers.

    One possible transcription method is to run an initial pass with Dragon, and then use InqScribe to follow along and edit its mistakes. I’ll note that we haven’t tested this method, and I imagine the results will vary widely from recording to recording. Check out this video on how to transcribe from an audio recording with Dragon 12 Pro.

    Parroting a transcript

    The most reliable method recommended by InqScribe users is to “parrot” your audio source. This entails listening to your media file and repeating everything you’d like to transcribe out loud into Dragon. Parroting is not automatic, but to some it’s a welcome alternative to the keyboard gymnastics of traditional transcription. Here are the steps:

    1. Launch Dragon NaturallySpeaking
    2. Open up a new InqScribe document
    3. Load your audio or video file by navigating to Select Media Source>Select File
    4. Press play (feel free to adjust the play speed to suite your pace)
    5. Listen to and repeat out load everything you’d like Dragon to write into your InqScribe transcript
    6. Once your finished transcribing, make sure to review the text for errors

    I found myself using voice recognition to get down the general text of the transcript while controlling media playback and timecodes using InqScribe’s keyboard shortcuts and my mouse. This frees your hands to focus on media manipulation. It’s also nice to have the precision of keyboard shortcuts for inserting timecodes.

    Dragon Transcript Capture

    InqScribe and Dragon in action

    How well does parroting work?

    As a speech recognition software, Dragon does a pretty good job of understanding your voice. It will even improve the more you use it. There is a bit of a learning curve, which mostly comes from training yourself to be effective with voice commands and corrections.

    You’ll have to learn to regularly check Dragon for mistakes because, as hard as it tries, it’s never going to be 100% accurate. Honestly, many of the errors I encountered felt like my own fault- from stuttering or not clearly annunciating  my words. As any transcriptionist knows, language is a messy thing. This means you’ll have to watch Dragon’s work for errors, which can disrupt your workflow. Even after your dictation, you’ll want to budget some time to make sure homophones like “example” don’t wind up as “egg sample.”

    Factoring in these corrections, I found parroting with Dragon to be slower than manually typing the transcript. This will certainly depend on your typing speed and how proficient you are with Dragon’s voice interface.

    Be aware that prolonged sessions will leave your voice tired. This might seem obvious, but you’ll get physically fatigued much faster than by typing normally. For this reason, I don’t think I would recommend Dragon to knock out wordy transcripts. I know my voice tires easily, so if you’re used to talking all day, it might be less of an issue for you (hello teachers).

    Overall, I’m not sure that I would recommend Dragon to someone who has no issue manually typing a transcript. It just doesn’t offer a clear advantage. If, however, you’re plagued by slow typing, mental blocks, physical impairments, or just love the sound of your own voice, then Dragon can be a great tool. Just be willing to make it through a high learning curve before you can really start plowing through transcripts.

  • Guest blog: A Filmmaker Uses InqScribe for Translations and Subtitles

    Posted on May 22nd, 2014 christina No comments

    InqScribe is popular among filmmakers for a variety of reasons. In our latest guest blog, Scott Squire shares his workflow to translate and create subtitles for his documentary.

    by Scott Squire, Independent Producer & InqScribe user

    Our movie, The Girl Who Knew Too Much is a feature documentary about women’s empowerment, the complexities of globalization and the crisis of mental health support in Nepal. We shot our movie over seven years on six different cameras, with varying degrees of asset management rigor. We ended up with nearly 200 hours of footage to be logged and/or translated and subtitled. This project taught us the value of having solid workflows—from managing footage in the field through the process of translation. We cannot stress the importance of having a process (that works with every camera!) before you shoot a single frame.

    Our translators at work

    Our workflow includes the use of InqScribe and Final Cut Pro to produce translations and final subtitles for our movie. Critical to our process is having a clear folder/file structure that essentially depicts our workflow. I will refer to the folder/filenames used on our project, but obviously these would change based on your own project details.

    Folder structure to organize our workflow

    Set up

    We make sure that the top-level directory is accessible from all of our workstations. Our workflow begins with our editor placing callouts for the media that needs translating in the folder called In1. Fiona Highlighted Documents. Sometimes these are snippets from a clip, sometimes a whole reel. She reads our transcripts and highlights them, and then sends us scans of the highlighted pages as PDFs. (Unfortunately, on this project, we didn’t have InqScribe at the start, which means our original transcripts were in a variety of formats.)

    Review the translation and verify timecode in InqScribe

    We assemble all of the relevant translated files and then create an InqScribe document for each clip. Our workflow involves moving the InqScribe transcripts through a series of reviews by native speakers who verify the accuracy of the translation and the placement of timecodes. Timecode references should be at least at 10-second intervals (we recommend every 4-5 seconds). Be careful with InqScribe’s sensitive timecode selection so that you don’t timecodes out of order. And be sure to have opening AND closing timecodes in InqScribe or else your subtitles will run too long.

    Export XML file from InqScribe to Final Cut Pro

    Once the translation is complete and the timecodes are reviewed, we use InqScribe to export an XML file to be used in Final Cut Pro. It’s good to keep your XML template easy to access because you’ll be using it a lot. We keep ours at the top-level folder of our shared directory: /Master Wrapping Subtitle Template v1.3 (use this one).xml.

    Instructions for creating a custom FCP 7 XML export template can be found in InqScribe’s Knowledge Base.

    Very important is the naming of files. InqScribe will show the default name as “export.xml.” Click the “Choose” button to select a destination to save the file. Navigate to /Out2. Subtitle XMLs for Final Cut Pro > Interview XMLs from InqScribe. The name of the XML needs to match the file it came from. The best way to do this is to navigate to the original InqScribe file, select and copy the name (all but the “.inqscr” extension) and paste this into the pane of the export dialog. Double check your naming and destination—this is a big pain if you get it wrong. CONSISTENCY and ACCURACY in naming and filing are CRITICAL.

    If you’re lucky, when you click “Export,” the export window will just close and your shiny new XML file will turn up in the proper place. If InqScribe alerts you to a non-consecutive timecode you will need to go back and correct where needed. The error will only tell you approximately where to start fixing first. Cancel out and go back to check all of the timecodes where the error message is indicated.

    Import XML files to Final Cut Pro (FCP)

    In Final Cut Pro, you will create a project (Subtitle_Master_Project) and import the first InqScribe XML file in the scene you just created. When you import the InqScribe XML, it will come into FCP as a sequence with the generic name that matches your text generator template (Master Wrapping Subtitle Template…). You must change this back to the name of the original file. As before, navigate back to the file and copy and paste the name in the FCP browser to replace the template name.

    Drag the newly imported sequence into the timeline. It will contain only a subtitle track. Next, import the associated master footage or locate the clip and drag it into the FCP browser window. When the media clip has been imported, be sure it’s in the right folder inside the browser. Drag the clip into the timeline so that you have both footage (video and audio) AND a subtitle track above the video. These should be the same length, but there may be gaps in the transcription file. If the closing timecode was correctly input in the InqScribe file, the endpoint will match the end point of the media.

    If you’ve done your job in InqScribe, the clip lengths should all match up and you’ll have a subtitled sequence! You can now export the sequence from Final Cut Pro as a XML to send to your editor.

    About the author

    Scott Squire is a filmmaker who, along with his wife Amy Benson, is the producer of The Girl Who Knew Too Much.

  • Create Subtitles with InqScribe and Final Cut Pro 7

    Posted on March 6th, 2014 christina No comments

    InqScribe’s integration with Final Cut Pro has made it a popular tool among filmmakers, particularly when their projects require generating subtitles.

    Sometimes we come across interesting blog posts from users about how they put InqScribe to use. Here’s one from Jessey Dearing of Talking Eyes Media about how he uses InqScribe along with Final Cut Pro 7 for subtitling. Take a look at his step-by-step guide for how to integrate these applications to quickly and easily produce subtitles for  film projects.

    Using InqScribe with Final Cut Pro

    Do you have an interesting story about how you’re using InqScribe? Please contact us at if you’d like to share a story about a workflow or a project that uses Inqscribe.

  • Guest Blog: InqScribe Saves Time When Logging Hours of Footage

    Posted on February 18th, 2014 christina No comments

    Filmmakers like InqScribe for a multitude of reasons. In our latest guest blog, Charlie Samuels talks about how he’s using InqScribe on his first film project.

    I am working on a film documentary about my skateboard team. Even if I make many films after this, Virgin Blacktop will be my opus. I’ve been working on this project for decades but until recently, I didn’t realize how important it would be to transcribe all of the footage that’s been shot. That is, until I got to the post production stage and ran into a wall. I realized that I would need a writer, and was reminded of something my mentor once told me: “No self-respecting film writer will take on a project without complete transcriptions of the footage—how else can they find anything?”

    I needed a fast way of documenting all of the footage with timecodes and descriptions. I have party scenes, action footage and general mayhem that can’t possibly be transcribed by dictation software. And accuracy in detail is paramount. That’s where InqScribe comes in.

    I got an army of interns and set them loose with over 125 hours of footage and copies of InqScribe. I needed to make good use of their time and get the footage transcribed in the fastest way possible. InqScribe came in handy because it allowed my interns to transcribe much faster than if they were just viewing the footage and logging in Word. One of the interns told me: “Having the footage connected to the transcriptions makes all the difference in speed and ease. It’s simple and intuitive and makes typing and stopping and starting the footage much faster. InqScribe actually doubles the speed of my ability to transcribe footage.”

    My project is still in development, but my dream of finishing this film will be realized sooner because I used InqScribe.

    About the author

    Photographer/filmmaker Charlie Samuels is known as the “50-year-old skateboarder” activist who led a 1.5 year effort to unearth a skateboard pool in Saratoga Springs NY. Charlie has been a freelance contributor to The New York Times since 1990. His images of skate legends Harold Hunter, Andy Kessler, Joe Humeres, Tony Hawk and Tony Alva have appeared in Sports Illustrated, New York magazine, Transworld Skateboarding, ESPN, People, Thrasher, the seminal N.Y.C. and the skate book FULL BLEED, as well as on Burton snowboards and Vans sneakers. He skated to the altar on his hands, helped build the first of NYC’s skateparks and has been issued a ticket for skating in the subway. Charlie now teaches skateboarding and is in post production on a skate documentary called Virgin Blacktop.